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Brian Dumaine – BEZONOMICS : How Amazon Is Changing Our Lives And What The World’s Best Companies Are Learning From It
Brian Dumaine – BEZONOMICS : How Amazon Is Changing Our Lives And What The World’s Best Companies Are Learning From It
Brian Dumaine – BEZONOMICS : How Amazon Is Changing Our Lives And What The World’s Best Companies Are Learning From It
Brian Dumaine – BEZONOMICS : How Amazon Is Changing Our Lives And What The World’s Best Companies Are Learning From It
Brian Dumaine – BEZONOMICS : How Amazon Is Changing Our Lives And What The World’s Best Companies Are Learning From It
Brian Dumaine – BEZONOMICS : How Amazon Is Changing Our Lives And What The World’s Best Companies Are Learning From It
Brian Dumaine – BEZONOMICS : How Amazon Is Changing Our Lives And What The World’s Best Companies Are Learning From It
Brian Dumaine – BEZONOMICS : How Amazon Is Changing Our Lives And What The World’s Best Companies Are Learning From It
Brian Dumaine – BEZONOMICS : How Amazon Is Changing Our Lives And What The World’s Best Companies Are Learning From It
Brian Dumaine – BEZONOMICS : How Amazon Is Changing Our Lives And What The World’s Best Companies Are Learning From It
Brian Dumaine – BEZONOMICS : How Amazon Is Changing Our Lives And What The World’s Best Companies Are Learning From It

#Preorder BEZONOMICS : How Amazon Is Changing Our Lives And What The World’s Best Companies Are Learning From It

DUMAINE BRIAN
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 A Crash Course On How Jeff Bezos Has Turned Amazon Into The World’s Lockdown Necessity

Additional information

ISBN 9781471184147
Publisher Simon & Schuster UK
Publication Date 20/05/2020
Pages 336
Weight 385 g
Dimension 23.4 × 15.3 × 2 cm
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An in-depth, revelatory, and unbiased look at Amazon’s world-dominating business model, the current competitors either imitating or trying to outfox Amazon, and the ways Bezonomics is shaping the life of every American consumer—from an award-winning Fortune magazine writer.

Bezonomics is a fascinating read!

The book gives readers an understanding of how Jeff Bezos (one of the world’s most successful entrepreneurs) thinks, what his values and priorities are, and his goals and visions for the future.

We also get an inside look at one of the world’s largest and most ubiquitous companies, and are shown how Jeff Bezos has changed the business world forever.

Amazon is the business story of the decade.

Like Henry Ford, Sam Walton, or Steve Jobs in the early years of Ford, Walmart, and Apple, Jeff Bezos is the business story of the decade.

Bezos, the richest man on the planet, has built one of the most efficient wealth-creation machines in history with 2% of US household income being spent on nearly 500 million products shipped from warehouses in seventeen countries.

Like a giant squid, Amazon’s tentacles are squeezing industry after industry and, in the process, upsetting the state of technology, the economy, job creation and society at large.

So pervasive is Amazon’s impact that business leaders in almost every sector need to understand how this force of nature operates and how they can respond to it.

Saying you can ignore Jeff Bezos is equivalent to saying you could ignore Henry Ford or Steve Jobs in the early years of Ford and Apple.

These titans monumentally changed how we do business, redefining the rules on a global scale.

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos is the new disruptor on the block.

He has created a 21st century algorithm for business and societal disruption.

He has turned the retail industry inside out, is swiftly dominating cloud computing, media and advertising, and now has his sights trained on every other domain where money changes hands and business is transacted.

Amazon’s business model has not only turned the retail industry and cloud computing inside out, but now its tentacles are squeezing media and advertising, and disrupting the state of technology, the economy, job creation, and society at large.

Amazon’s impact is so pervasive that business leaders in nearly every sector around the world need to understand how this force of nature operates.

But the principles by which Bezos has achieved his dominance – customer obsession, extreme innovation and long-term management, all supported by artificial intelligence turning a virtuous-cycle ‘flywheel’ – are now being borrowed and replicated. ‘Bezonomics’ is for some a goldmine, for others a threat, for still others a life-shaping force, whether they’re in business or not.

Based on unprecedented behind-the-scenes reporting from 150 sources inside and outside of Amazon, Bezonomics unveils the underlying principles Jeff Bezos uses to achieve his dominance—customer obsession, extreme innovation, and long-term management, all supported by artificial intelligence—and shows how these are being borrowed and replicated by companies across the United States, in China, and elsewhere. Brian Dumaine shares tips for Amazon-proofing your business.

Most important, Bezonomics answers the fundamental question: How are Amazon and its imitators affecting the way we live, and what can we learn from them?

Amazon long believed that if it took care of its customers everything else would follow.

Many of us have benefited from that belief. But Amazon’s brand of capitalism also suggests that this obsessive focus on customers can be just as lopsided as the single-minded focus on shareholder returns, now falling from fashion.

Dumaine’s book contends that Bezos has created the defining model for other businesses.

Yet few seem to be copying it.

In that regard, the most compelling company of our time is also oddly out of step with it.

A goldmine for some, and a threat for others, “Bezonomics” has become a life-shaping force both now and in the future that every American must know more about.

What makes this book a great read, however, is the way Dumaine shines a light on the man who has made Amazon such a success.
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Review From Financial Times (FT)

A flattering account of Amazon’s founder as a business hero of our age

Is Jeff Bezos our age’s model entrepreneur, whose unwavering customer focus made Amazon so essential to the world’s locked-down middle classes that it could thrive even in a pandemic?

Or is he the billionaire villain who epitomises the tax-skirting and people-squeezing kind of capitalism that has gone sour, as the crisis has focused attention on the costs of the convenience Amazon epitomises?

His fans and foes will never agree, but one thing is clear to both: Amazon’s growth, from selling its first book in 1995 to joining the elite club of trillion-dollar companies, is one of our era’s most compelling business stories.

Remarkably few have so far told that tale well at book length. Brad Stone’s The Everything Store, a winner of the FT/McKinsey Business Book of the Year award, still stands out among them. But it was published in 2013, when Amazon was worth just $150bn.

In this book, Brian Dumaine sets out to capture all that the now $1.2tn company has since become, and to illuminate what he calls “the business model of the 21st century”.

The Fortune contributor defines that model as “a potent cocktail of customer obsession, crazy innovation, and long-term thinking driven by a relentless AI flywheel”.

The concept of the flywheel will be familiar to readers of Stone’s book.

In Dumaine’s retelling, Amazon starts by understanding what customers want, which helps it lower costs, freeing up capital to enhance its offering, which in turn attracts more customers, and so on.

The twist, he says, is that two decades of honing its artificial intelligence expertise has created “the first and most sophisticated AI-driven business model in history, one that gets smarter and bigger on its own”.

If other businesses fail to master their own AI flywheels, he writes, a handful of global AI oligopolies may soon control everything from our purchases to our health and finances.

It is a rare note of warning in an otherwise overwhelmingly flattering account.

Discussing Mr Bezos’s recent philanthropy, for example, Dumaine says it would be easy to suspect PR motives, but Bezos should be given the benefit of the doubt.

His book almost always gives its subject that benefit, without considering whether the doubts others harbour could undermine Amazon’s economics.

A simple list of what Amazon now does, from small business lending to leasing its own ships, captures both its extraordinary record of innovation and why critics fear it is too powerful.

Yet Dumaine seems to believe that only oddball privacy advocates and leftist “political theatre” practitioners find its expanding reach a problem.

The question of whether Amazon is good or bad is “a complex one”, he says. He grants that jobs in Amazon warehouses are demeaning, but lauds the company for creating hundreds of thousands of them — before praising its investment in the robots that will soon provide a “humane” alternative to such drudgery.

Rising political antipathy to Amazon’s low tax bills could “someday” change its bottom line, Dumaine concedes, but he does not see this happening soon.

Besides, he asserts, any fault lies with the nature of capitalism — an odd claim given the strides other businesses have made in better balancing the interests of shareholders, employees and society.

This book does a valuable job of explaining how Amazon sees itself, but struggles to examine the company from any other perspective.

That makes it a frustratingly one-sided read. It also points to a blind spot within the company itself.

It is worth contemplating how much more attractive Amazon’s economics would be if it devoted a fraction of the attention it brings to understanding customers to the task of engaging with its less-enamoured stakeholders.

Amazon long believed that if it took care of its customers everything else would follow.

Many of us have benefited from that belief. But Amazon’s brand of capitalism also suggests that this obsessive focus on customers can be just as lopsided as the single-minded focus on shareholder returns, now falling from fashion.

Dumaine’s book contends that Bezos has created the defining model for other businesses. Yet few seem to be copying it. In that regard, the most compelling company of our time is also oddly out of step with it.
﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉﹉
Review From The Scotsman:

This look at Amazon’s rapidly expanding empire was written before the Covid-19 pandemic really took hold, but headlines that the company’s boss – and the world’s richest man –Jeff Bezos has seen his fortune grow by at least $24 billion (£19bn) during the crisis as consumers flock to Amazon’s convenient embrace only makes this highly engaging study all the more relevant.

Bezonomics is the work of journalist Brian Dumaine, who looks at how Amazon and its imitators are significantly affecting how we live and do business, and what we can learn from them.

Dumaine outlines how Bezos has created a 21st century algorithm for business and societal disruption, shaken retail to its foundations, is rapidly dominating cloud computing, media and advertising, and now has his sights trained on a wealth of new areas – including healthcare and financial services. It’s an addictive read – one of the most compelling business books I’ve ever read.

It also illustrates just how all-pervasive Amazon has become – few of us can claim never to have shopped at Amazon, but Dumaine points out how its presence in, say, cloud computing means we are often using its services without realising.

Meanwhile, Dumaine notes the eyebrow-raising finding that more American households have Amazon Prime memberships than go to church.

This book is meticulously researched, and features many interviews with characters who have been part of the online behemoth’s journey, yet it never veers too far into dry details and is written engagingly, with the occasional, welcome wry comment.

Dumaine notes that Amazon’s pillars of customer obsession, extreme innovation and long-term management, all supported by artificial intelligence, turn a virtuous-cycle “flywheel” – a concept that gets several mentions.

According to Dumaine, Bezos has “created a new turbocharged way of thinking that will change the way successful businesses are run in the 21st century.”

That said, this is no hagiography. As well as pivotal moves into areas like Prime and Alexa, the author also flags mis-fires such as the Fire Phone.

Nor does he shy away from shining a spotlight on other headline-grabbing negative aspects of what he calls the “most formidable capitalist machine in history”.

These include the well-known concerns over treatment of workers, aversion to unions and lack of corporate tax paid, as well as the concerning privacy implications over the audio files Alexa is collecting.

Bezonomics also tells the cautionary tale of a marketplace seller who proved a victim of his own success due to Amazon’s beady eye scrutinising his sales.

Bezos’ model, says Dumaine, “is going to change the world in a way that’s more profound than most of us can imagine”. Having read this book, it’s hard to disagree.
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KIRKUS REVIEW :

Abusiness journalist examines the widespread influence of Amazon’s strategies.

Drawing on Brad Stone’s The Everything Store (2013), much media coverage, and more than 100 interviews, Fortune magazine contributing editor Dumaine offers a lively history of Amazon’s huge success and forecasts its effect on 21st-century business.

The author clearly admires Jeff Bezos for his astute melding of big data and artificial intelligence in running “the smartest company the world has ever seen.”

Bezos, Dumaine writes, is “a force of nature, moving at warp speed through a vast canvas.”

He has the ability “to face the unvarnished truth no matter how inconvenient, to make decisions based on cold, hard facts.”

He reads “at an Olympic level,” quickly absorbing information and responding in detail with “both strategic and tactical feedback.”

He takes a long view, thinking “in terms of decades and centuries.” He harbors “an ambition to be seen as more than a businessman—as rather, a cultural force, an idea merchant.”

The author does acknowledge some shortcomings: Bezos’ “fact-driven, relentlessly focused mind” can make him appear “as less than empathic,” especially to his employees and community, earning him a reputation as a plutocrat.

Dumaine’s recounting of Amazon’s rise, as well as his portrayal of Bezos, is likely to be familiar to readers who keep up with business news.

Besides analyzing the company’s success, the author speculates about what areas Bezos will disrupt in the future: Likely suspects include advertising; health care, with Amazon offering prescription drugs, home health care products, and remote monitoring by medical practitioners; and banking—Amazon would become “a digital financial business offering checking accounts, loans, and mortgages.”

As Dumaine asserts, “the list of new ventures for Amazon keeps growing” along with an increasing number of business consultants advising clients on how to compete.

A brisk look at the business giant.

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About the Author

Brian Dumaine is an award-winning journalist and a contributing editor at Fortune magazine. In addition to Bezonomics his works include The Plot to Save the Planet, and, with three coauthors, Go Long: Why Long-Term Thinking Is Your Best Short-Term Strategy. He and his wife live in New York.

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