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Bill Coplin – 10 THINGS EMPLOYERS WANT YOU TO LEARN IN COLLEGE : The Know-How You Need To Succeed
Bill Coplin – 10 THINGS EMPLOYERS WANT YOU TO LEARN IN COLLEGE : The Know-How You Need To Succeed
Bill Coplin – 10 THINGS EMPLOYERS WANT YOU TO LEARN IN COLLEGE : The Know-How You Need To Succeed
Bill Coplin – 10 THINGS EMPLOYERS WANT YOU TO LEARN IN COLLEGE : The Know-How You Need To Succeed
Bill Coplin – 10 THINGS EMPLOYERS WANT YOU TO LEARN IN COLLEGE : The Know-How You Need To Succeed
Bill Coplin – 10 THINGS EMPLOYERS WANT YOU TO LEARN IN COLLEGE : The Know-How You Need To Succeed
Bill Coplin – 10 THINGS EMPLOYERS WANT YOU TO LEARN IN COLLEGE : The Know-How You Need To Succeed
Bill Coplin – 10 THINGS EMPLOYERS WANT YOU TO LEARN IN COLLEGE : The Know-How You Need To Succeed
Bill Coplin – 10 THINGS EMPLOYERS WANT YOU TO LEARN IN COLLEGE : The Know-How You Need To Succeed
Bill Coplin – 10 THINGS EMPLOYERS WANT YOU TO LEARN IN COLLEGE : The Know-How You Need To Succeed

10 Things Employers Want You to Learn in College : The Know-How You Need to Succeed

Bill Coplin
Brand-new, Paperback

RM19.00

How To Acquire Marketable Job Skills Before Graduating

Availability: In stock

Additional information

ISBN 9781580085243
Publisher Random House USA Inc
Publication Date 30/09/2003
Pages 256
Weight 386 g
Dimension 22.6 × 14.7 × 17.8 cm
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Description

In today’s economy, is college really worth its cost and time?

You’ll learn a lot of things in college, but there’s one thing the textbooks won’t teach you : HOW TO ACQUIRE MARKETABLE JOB SKILLS BEFORE YOU GRADUATE.

For any academic advisor who has heard these words from puzzled students questioning higher education’s legitimacy, there is a now a relevant resource: Bill Coplin’s newly revised edition of 10 Things Employers Want You to Learn in College.

Coplin provides students with copious amounts of evidence that college is an unparalleled learning experience, because it creates the opportunity to obtain crucial skill sets that employers desire.

Coplin’s firsthand advising experience, paired with detailed interviews held with various professionals and employers, creates validity to his concepts.

This handy, straightforward guide that teaches students how to acquire marketable job skills and real-world know-how before they graduate—revised and updated for today’s economic and academic landscapes.

Award-winning college professor and adviser Bill Coplin lays down the essential skills students need to survive and succeed in today’s job market, based on his extensive interviews with employers, recruiters, HR specialists, and employed college grads.

Going beyond test scores and GPAs, Coplin teaches students how to maximize their college experience by focusing on ten crucial skill groups: Work Ethic, Physical Performance, Speaking, Writing, Teamwork, Influencing People, Research, Number Crunching, Critical Thinking, and Problem Solving.

10 Things Employers Want You to Learn in College gives students the tools they need to prepare during their undergraduate years to impress potential employers, land a higher-paying job, and start on the road to career security and satisfaction.

10 THINGS EMPLOYERS WANT YOU TO LEARN IN COLLEGE
(Skills for Any Professional Career)

① Establishing a Work Ethic
• Be Honest
• Manage Your Time

② Developing Physical Skills
• Stay Well
• Look Good

③ Communicating Verbally
• Converse One-on-One
• Present to Groups

④ Communicating in Writing
• Write Well
• Edit and Proof

⑤ Working Directly with People
• Build Good Relationships
• Work in Teams
• Teach Others

⑥ Influencing People
• Manage Efficiently
• Lead Effectively

⑦ Gathering Information
• Search the Web
• Conduct Interviews
• Use Surveys

⑧ Using Quantitative Tools
• Use Numbers
• Use Surveys
• Use Spreadsheet Programs

⑨ Asking and Answering the Right Questions
• Pay attention to Detail
• Apply Knowledge
• Evaluate Actions and Policies

⑩ Solving Problems
• Identify Problems
• Develop Solutions
• Launch Solutions

In Short, Coplin’s practical approach will help you develop a personal plan for boosting those marketable skills during your college years so you can impress potential employers, land a higher-paying job, and start on the road to career security and satisfaction as soon as you graduate

Coplin’s work is divided into three main parts.

This first part explains 10 college skill sets and where a student fits on the spectrum, from excelling to being a novice at a skill.

The second part of his work teaches students how to gain competence in skills through picking the right college program, professors, internship, graduate school, and off-campus experiences.

He concludes his book by explaining how to transfer skill sets to one’s resume, cover letter, networking, and interviewing practices; Coplin’s book provides detailed examples of each of these career tools.

One of many distinguishing features of this book is the amount of useful resources referenced, such as websites, organizations, and books, which are listed at the end of every chapter.

This allows a student to delve into learning about a skill in as much depth as desired.

With this gamut of resources, anyone who is interested or involved in higher education would benefit from reading this book: parents, first generation students, high school students, career counselors, and especially academic advisors.

Concluding the skills chapters is a section that tells students what classes to take in order to flourish in a certain skill.

This section provides academic advisors with specific skills that are being developed in almost every class—which is a perfect tool for when students ask what is the purpose of classes they are disinterested in.

Coplin’s networking section could have included the impact of e-portfolios, participating in a gap year, or blogging.

Incorporating focus groups of students who followed Coplin’s skill set development theories would have added more legitimacy to his work.

Furthermore, a chapter explaining if these skill sets transcend to other countries would be helpful for students living in an increasingly globalized world.

This book shatters students’ ability to only think about what is currently going on in their lives and refocuses them on seeing every choice they make as an investment in the rest of their life.

Coplin (2012) explains, “Course work and degree requirements will provide less than 50 percent of the skills required to be successful in whatever career field you choose” (p. 133).

The other fifty percent comes from skill set development that is showcased in his book.

There is more to college than just the diploma; thus, advisors should be avid advocates of intentional skill set development.
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About the Author

BILL COPLIN has been a professor and the director of the undergraduate public affairs program at Syracuse University since 1976. Since 2000, Coplin has focused his efforts on improving the high school and college education systems, designing and implementing curriculum that develops students’ career and citizenship skills. He serves as the curriculum consultant to the High School for Leadership and Public Service in New York City.

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